Weight loss support with a spiritual element. I will keep you posted on my journey in the hopes that you will join me in becoming the person God wants you to be. Don't worry about being religious. Come as you are.




Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Look Familiar?




Have you been noticing more and more of these in the grocery stores lately? I have. I was in Kroger a few days ago and had to maneuver around someone like this to get to where I wanted to go. It's kind of irritating. I looked at the gal in the scooter and she was probably younger than I am but then I don't know her situation and shouldn't judge. There could have been a perfectly good reason for the need of the scooter.

Those things are expensive. They are very expensive. Many stores provide them and some people do need them. My mom doesn't go to big stores like Wal-Mart or Meijer too much because of the walking required. She is 86 and has neuropathy in her feet. She doesn't use one of these however when she does go to these large stores. She uses the shopping cart for support. This guy is not 86 but he obviously does need the scooter.

What is the answer to these people who drive up the cost of healthcare and of doing business? How empathetic should we be since we all understand obesity and have lived it?

What is your opinion on this? It starts out with a political ad so just wait for the video please.

 http://www.39online.com/newsfix/kiah-mass-doctor-refuses-to-see-patients-over-200-pounds-20120830,0,4078936.story

How much success does any doctor have treating obesity? Do people just come there wanting a drug? Did you notice the 200 lb. woman said "I thought doctors were there to help you."? Should it take up a doctor's time to deal with someone who already knows what to do?  I really think, and we all know, that a motivated person can lose weight. Can doctors provide this motivation in a somewhat negative way by letting patients know they will not see them after a certain weight is reached? As the person's weight goes up the doctor could do a little questioning and counseling to point that person in the right direction.

But what about extenuating circumstances? Diabetes, heart, blood pressure? Would this be a death sentence for someone who goes over the stated limit if they won't be treated or can't find a doctor? Would some "tough love" wake people up? I have more questions than answers on this one.

I hope I never have to use one of those things.

I do know I won't weigh over 200 lb. again.

Be careful out there today.





14 comments:

  1. My mom went to Disneyworld with her friends last week. She rented on of those at the park. Broke my heart.

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    1. Sorry, Beth :( Sucks to see our parents like that.

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  2. Myra, there is so much in this post that I want to comment on, not sure where to start.

    My doctor was not successful when he attempted to 'treat' me for my obesity. And by treatment, I mean he always recommended that I eat less, move more. He never called me 'fat' but stated the truth: I was overweight and I needed to fix it. His words were lost on me at the time & I would leave his office, hurt, sad and ready to eat. I don't believe my doctor treated my obesity - I treated my obesity. When I was good and ready. And not because I wanted to be healthy. Because I wanted to be pretty.

    We live in a society where obese people (adults & children) are seen as a new demographic to market products to - from clothes to plus sized beds to those scooters - it's all about making money. Let's face it, the scooters are provided in stores so obese people can SHOP & the store can make MONEY. Yes, some people need them for other medical issues - but many times they are for morbidly obese people who can't walk. But if they can drive a scooter, they can shop.

    I look at the doctor refusing to see patients over 200lbs as a black/white issue. She is within her rights to do that. There are plenty of doctors in the sea for us to choose from.

    I was at the podiatrist for my foot issue last week and I was just stunned by the amount of overweight people in the office. Young people, older people...with canes, with limps. I suspect most of them were there to get their toe nails clipped or feet taken care of because of diabetes. There was actually an informative video playing about obesity while we waited. I was the only one who watched.

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    1. I am much more aware of obesity as I am out and about and see people in such poor condition. It's maddening that I could have been one of those people - someone who has to know he/she is the cause of the condition and endures it and even makes it worse for the sake of food/eating. Why would anyone endure that and not do what they could to clear it up themselves to a great extent? We have to treat our obesity ourselves. There is no other way. Take care and hope the foot is on the mend.

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  3. I will be honest here and say that I may not be as understanding as many who have had a much more serious weight issue than I have had, so my opinions may come off as harsh.
    Many people in my family are seriously overweight and I have seen very well how they got that way- eating whole cartons of icecream while sitting on the couch every night, doing crazy yo-yo dieting, taking 'miracle' drugs, refusing to do something as simple as start moving by walking around the block, drinking to excess. I hated seeing it all and ended up as a person who has always been active and doesn't care much for excuses. Still I ended up 50 lbs. overweight before I came to my senses and realized that the stress of dealing with said family caused me to graze through the kitchen every time I left their presence. I suppose the fact that they all 'announced' that I would be fat like them one day didn't help either.
    Much of it is so buried in emotional issues. So I do have some pity and understanding, but then I have to admit that the minute I was going to have to shop in the plus sizes, my weight never went up from there and I wouldn't shop in that area. I also never stopped being active no matter what.
    Still, yes I have made the comment that if you cannot buy clothes at ANY store and it all has to be specialty, expensive stuff then don't people notice this is a problem??? Or talked at length about how lame most excuses are, period. I'm not always understanding of other peoples limitations and often wonder if they bring them on themselves.
    We all have our limits of denial and it seems that nobody can be ready for another person to lose weight. They have to do it themselves. It always comes down to that, doesn't it? For some the moment will be not being able to fit into a certain outfit. For others, it's not being able to fit into a car.
    I'm not sure any amount of pushing will ever change things for most people. I can't help but think of the thin woman I knew who continued to chain smoke, even as she was hospitalized for multiple strokes!
    Love the discussion and the open and honest way you introduce the topic. Just not sure any of us can ever do anything to change someone elses health choices. I have tried many things: being a workout buddy, calling constantly to invite people for healthy food and activities, offering to watch peoples kids so they can workout. If you're not ready, it ain't gonna' happen and that scooter looks pretty good to someone whose feet hurt and they just want to get through their day.

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    1. I remember one year before school started and Nathan was in his teens saying to him that we were going to have to buy him 32 waist jeans. He was quite chubby and said to me, "I will not wear 32 waist jeans." He began lifting weights and slimmed down and is now a very low percentage of body fat. I had an aunt with terrible emphysema who had to drag an oxygen tank with her everywhere she went. She would take all that stuff off and smoke. We want health for others more than they want it in so many instances. Be careful out there today.

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  4. I have such mixed feelings about the doctor who refused to treat patients over 200lbs. Actually, I take that back. I do not have mixed feelings about the decision - she is well within her rights to choose who she treats and the offended lady should just go and find another doctor instead of making a stink about it.
    I do have mixed feelings about my opinion toward the obese now. I was fat because of things *I* did. I knew what to do, and refused to do them... so because I made the choice to be unhealthy and fat should I feel entitled to be treated fairly like everyone else? I'm not so sure now. I would get all offended when I heard airlines require fat people to buy two seats but now.. now I see the reason.
    The nice doctors would overlook my weight, the harsh doctors would make me leave crying - but in the end I did this because of me. I don't know - I'm a mixed bag now since I've been on both sides.

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    1. Decisions are going to be made for these people based on an objective view of their situation and it isn't going to matter if they are someone's mother, another's daughter, etc. It is going to seem cold-hearted but the facts remain. People who knowingly and intentionally ruin their health are going to have to pay higher premiums and deductibles and will be given ultimatums regarding weight. You and I are both older and wiser now regarding obesity. We know it can be done. We know the obese can do it. Why should the rest of us pay for their poor choices? Take care?

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  5. Back in March, my husband was diagnosed with diabetes. The doctor simpy grabbed her prescription pad and wrote him a prescription for metformin. She never even mentioned any lifestyle changes that could help reverse his diabetes.

    Thankfully, he took action on his own - losing over 60 pounds, reversing his diabetes, and ditching the high blood pressure medicine to boot!

    I'm so glad he was ready to do what he needed to to reclaim his health, but I was a little shocked that she never even bothered to try and educate him on the benefits of making dietary changes.

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    1. Congratulations to your husband. He already knew what to do and maybe the doctor knew that? It sometimes takes a jolt to move us to action and her reaction may have been the correct one - leave the ball in his court. Take care.

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  6. My birth mother is morbidly obese and a type II diabetic to boot. She does absolutely nothing to change her medical situation and is constantly coming to the "big city" for tests and treatments that my tax dollars are paying for. May sound harsh, but she's doing nothing to help herself and has not done a single thing to treat her diabetes. It makes me angry because now she's in really bad shape...and she could have done things to prevent this.

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    1. Such people must just adapt to feeling bad and accept it I guess. It's hard to imagine how we can be so self-destructive. We let ourselves get morbidly obese and could have stopped it long before we did so from that aspect I understand. I always hated it and longed to be slim. I always kept trying and finally can say I have changed. Finally things fell into place. Take care.

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  7. Recently I was at a gathering and overheard a conversation between two other friends who were talking about their doctor They are both quite overweight and were both very upset at their doctor for telling them the truth about their climbing weight. She listed the health risks plainly. She told them both they needed to cut back the intake and up the exercise before things got much more serious.

    Their reaction? They are both changing doctors because they considered her to be 'rude' and that their weight was 'none of her business.'

    Really, really....how is a doctor supposed to deal with this attitude?

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    1. I don't blame doctors for choosing not to work with these people. They get defensive and angry. Doctors can be spending their time with people who appreciate their efforts. Take care.

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